Dunhuang Projected

The 2016 COB sidebar takes its name from the Gobi Desert oasis town in northwestern China that was, for 1,000 years from 400-1400 CE, an important nexus of the Silk Road and the gateway for Buddhism from India into China. The town’s mile-long complex of caves holds the largest extant collection of Buddhist mural art and sculptures in the world, and is recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Marco Polo is reputed to have passed through Dunhuang, as did the 7th-century Buddhist monk Xuanzang whose 15-year-long journey to India to procure Buddhist scriptures was immortalized in the Chinese literary classic and now cinematic staple, Journey to the West. Dunhuang Projected asks what reverberations medieval Dunhuang may hold for our global present, and how it may do so filmically, correlating what was spiritual illumination in the dark—the cave art of Dunhuang—with what is literal illumination in the dark – the art of cinema.

A DEER OF NINE COLORS
九色鹿

Directed by Qian Jiajun and Dai Tielang

NIGHTFALL ON SHANGHAI Tombée de nuit sur Shanghai

Directed by Chantal Akerman

ATA 照见

Directed by Chakme Rinpoche

THE CAVE OF THE SILKEN WEB
盘丝洞

Directed by Dan Duyu

JOURNEY TO THE WEST
西游

Directed by Tsai Ming-liang

THE MONKEY KING 2
西游记之孙悟空三打白骨精

Directed by Soi Cheang

SAVING MES AYNAK

Directed by Brent Huffman

STAGE SISTERS
舞台姐妹

Directed by Xie Jin